Cymric

Characterised by its distinctive tailless appearance, the Cymric has a strong following amongst cat lovers because of its unique looks, gentle nature and playful behaviour. The Cymric is a highly intelligent, extremely curious, people-oriented breed. It can learn to manipulate door handles, fetching games and leash walking. It is calm and even tempered, and gets along well with children and other pets. Powerful hindquarters make it easier for the Cymric to explore higher places of interest to satisfy its curious nature. Due to its affectionate and easygoing nature, the Cymric is ideal for families with older children and other pets; however, this gentle cat can turn dangerous if a loved one is threatened, and frequently acts as a “watch-cat”.


Cymric Breed Information


History
Originally limited to the Isle of Man, the Cymric, and its sister breed the Manx, have been around so long its tailless feature is sometimes attributed to the biblical legend of Noah. However, its unique attribute is a result of a genetic mutation, which due to the island’s close environment and small gene pool, soon became rampant. The Cymric was simply considered a longhaired variant of the Manx breed till the 1960s. It gained popularity as a breed of its own when dedicated breeding programmes were undertaken by breeders across Canada to boost its popularity. The Cymric is registered as a separate cat breed by many cat registries like Federation Internationale Feline (FIFe), World Cat Federation (WCF), American Association of Cat Enthusiasts (AACE), Canadian Cat Association (CCA), New Zealand Cat Fancy (NZCF), and American Cat Fanciers Association (ACFA); on the other hand, the Cymric is recognised by that name by The International Cat Association (TICA) and Australian Cat Federation (ACF), but is considered to be a variety of Manx and not a separate breed in its own standard.
Personality
The Cymric is a highly intelligent, extremely curious, people-oriented breed. It can learn to manipulate door handles, fetching games and leash walking. It is calm and even tempered, and gets along well with children and other pets. Powerful hindquarters make it easier for the Cymric to explore higher places of interest to satisfy its curious nature.
  • Activity level: 2.5/5 (mildly active)
  • Intelligence level: 3/5 (quite intelligent)
  • Curiosity: 3/5 (quite curious)
  • Friendliness: 4/5 (very friendly)
  • Vocal: 3/5 (quite vocal)
Appearance
These cats are compact, muscular and large to medium in size with a strong bone structure, weighing around seven to thirteen pound. They boast a cobby body, and unusually rounded look. These cats have large and very full eyes with widely spaced ears. The most eye-catching feature of the Cymric is its tailless appearance. The main characteristics are:
  • Fur: Long, soft double coat which comes in all traditional colours and patterns; fluffy breeches and neck ruff are present.
  • Eyes: Round eyes; usually yellow or orange coloured.
  • Body structure: Medium to large size. Round compact, muscular body; has an arched back, smaller front legs, powerful hindquarters. The tail vertebrae may be present with varying degrees of development in some specimens.
  • Facial features: Round face with round cheeks; ears are pointed and set at a tilt.
  • Weight: Male Cymric may weigh more than 12 lbs, whereas the female may weigh between 8-12 lbs.
Health and Care
Grooming two-three times every week is recommended to remove dead hair and distribute skin oil. Daily brushing is recommended to avoid periodontal diseases. Ears must be checked weekly. Dirty ear must be cleaned with cotton balls moistened with a 50/50 mixture of cider vinegar and warm water; cotton swabs should not be used to prevent ear damage. Care has to be taken while breeding the Cymric, as kittens inheriting two copies of the Manx gene often die before birth and are reabsorbed. The tailless gene in the Cymric can cause fused vertebrae, gaps in vertebrae and bowel/urinary tract infections and spina bifida. Veterinary examination, x-rays, myelography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans is utilised for detection of spina bifida, whereas UTI is detected by the means of urinalysis.
We have gathered this information from our breeders based on their experience with this breed. However, remember that each animal is different with its own personality and needs (just like people!), so use this information wisely. Do you know more about this breed and want to share your knowledge with us? Send us an email at help@pickapaw.com