Manx

Stubbin, rumpy, bunny-cat or cabbit – the Manx is called by many names, but its distinctive tailless appearance is unique in the feline world, making this isle of Manx inhabitant a cherished favourite of cat enthusiasts all over the world. This playful and active cat is very affectionate towards its owner and will engage in games if given half a chance. The Manx, because of its gentle and friendly nature, is suitable for households with previous pets, small children and individuals.


Manx Breed Information


History
Some say the first Manx was seen swimming to the shore, marooned when a Spanish ship sank off the coast; other go even further in history all the way to the Bible, claiming that the cat had its tail cut off when Noah accidently closed the door on its tail. The real reason for its tailless appearance is the recessive Manx gene, which causes a shortening of tailbone; the gene spread across the Manx populace on the isle due to its small gene pool. The first Manx champion was a rumpy Manx male called Silverwing in 1902 in the UK. The Manx has been recognised as a championship cat by CFA since 1908 and by TICA since 1979. However, only the rumpy (tailless) or the rumpy-riser (tail stub) are considered eligible, with the stumpy (short tailed) and the longy (full tailed) are considered ineligible.
Personality
Temperament This playful and active cat is very affectionate towards its owner and will engage in games if given half a chance. The Manx, because of its gentle and friendly nature, is suitable for households with previous pets, small children and individuals.
  • Activity level: 2/5 (mildly active)
  • Intelligence level: 3/5 (quite intelligent)
  • Curiosity: 3/5 (quite curious)
  • Friendliness: 3/5 (quite friendly)
  • Vocal: 2/5 (mildly vocal)
Appearance
The most distinctive feature of the Manx is its tailless appearance. However, not all kittens are completely tailless; depending upon the dominance of the Manx gene, they may have varying tail lengths. Moreover, due to the spine shortening, the Manx also has a peculiar, hop-like gait.
  • Fur: Thick double layered coat which comes in all traditional colours and patterns.
  • Eyes: Round eyes; usually yellow or orange coloured.
  • Body structure: Medium to large size. Compact, muscular body; arched back, powerful hindquarters, smaller front legs. Different tail vertebrae – rumpy (tailless), rumpy-riser (tail stub), stumpy (short tail) and longy (full tail).
  • Facial features: Round skull with round cheek; tilted, pointy ears.
  • Weight: Male Manx may weigh more than 12 lbs; female may weigh between 8-12 lbs.
Health and Care
Kitten with two Manx parents are born without a tail due to the dominant and highly penetrant nature of the Manx gene. However, care needs to be taken while breeding the Manx; having two copies of the gene is usually lethal and often results in miscarriage due to fatality in-utero. Moreover, excessive shortening of spine in the Manx could also cause from Spina Bifida due to spinal cord damage and nerves. This disease is very hard to diagnose, and for that reason the Manx is usually kept by breeder until four months from its birth as the disease usually manifests by that age. However, on onset, vets use a combination of tests like Myelography, X-Rays and MRI scans to diagnose this disease. Caring for a Manx is comparatively easier than the other cats. Brushing the coat every week is recommended to help remove dead hair and help spread oil evenly throughout the fur, whereas daily teeth brushing is required to prevent periodontal diseases.
We have gathered this information from our breeders based on their experience with this breed. However, remember that each animal is different with its own personality and needs (just like people!), so use this information wisely. Do you know more about this breed and want to share your knowledge with us? Send us an email at help@pickapaw.com
Manx Breeders: